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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
with the deficit in the biggest way. but their only priority is making sure that tax breaks for the wealthiest americans are protected. at some point, i think what's important is that they listen to the american people. >> joining me now, congressman chris von holland of maryland. good evening. it is a good sign that chained cpi is off the table. the senate will be back tomorrow at 11:00. how high is your optimism or pessimism at this moment? >> well, it was a very bad sign when senator mcconnell put this social security change on the table, as part of a small deal, that was obviously something that could have totally thrown a monkey wrench into the process. so the fact that they backed off that is obviously good news. but as senator reid said, there are lots of obstacles still to go. and the fundamental issue remains what the president just said in that clip. both today and for the last year, the number one priority of republicans have been -- has been to use the middle class tax cuts as leverage to try and extract these super big tax breaks for very wealthy individuals, including now their f
on the senate, and as democrats dig in to protect social programs, republicans do the same on taxes. >> raising taxes to pay for new spending is not something that republicans believe this debate ought to be about. it ought to be about reducing the deficit and the debt, and what they are essentially suggesting is we want new taxes. we want higher taxes on people in this country to pay for new spending. >> so what happens next? with us nbc news capitol hill correspondent mike vic rah and nbc news white house correspondent kristen welker. mike, let's get started with you. what's happening right now in the senate. i understand there's an update on the chained cpi. >> reporter: they say the darkest hour right before the dawn, melissa. everybody ought to hope that's true, at least if you don't want to see your taxes go up on midnight on monday and tuesday night because everything seems to be at a standstill right now. let's review the bidding. here it is from a republican source here on the republican side of capitol hill. all day yesterday they were trading proposals back and forth. by his count tw
that they agree that it is important now to keep taxes from going up on most people and accept the reality that they will go up by the top 1 pshgs 2%, 250,000 in income and above. and it does look, to me, that there are enough votes if senator reid puts that on the floor for it to break the 60. but the republican probably going to filibuster it. >> even at 250,000, not 400 or 500, other numbers that have been floated? >> those are the compromise numbers. that's an effort by the president and senator reid to bring the republicans along. but senator reid said his preference is 250,000, which i agree with, by the way. what we're talking about is 4.6% increase in taxes. that means if you're making 250,000 ayear for every additional 1,000 you'll pay $46. the notion of paying $46 out of 1,000 for wealthy people has any negative affect on anybody, i confirmed this talking to one of wealthiest men of boston, i asked if we were to raise taxes by that amount on him would he know it if his accountant didn't make a point of telling him. he said of course not. but in any case the 400 is an effort to ha
to understand exactly what this fiscal cliff is. it's actually not that complicated. the tax cuts that were introduced in 2001, 2003, 2010, those were extended, and they are all about to expire at the end of the year. so on midnight december 31, if congress doesn't act, then everybody's taxes go up. and for the average family, that could mean a loss of $2,000 in income. for the entire economy, that means consumers have a lot less money to make purchases, which means businesses are going to have a lot less customers, which means that they are less likely to hire, and the whole economy could slow down at a time when the economy is actually starting to pick up. we are seeing signs of recovery in housing and in employment numbers improving. and so what congress needs to do, first and foremost, is to prevent taxes from going up for the vast majority of americans. and this was a major topic of discussion throughout the campaign. what i said was that we should keep taxes where they are for 98% of americans. 97% of small businesses. but if we're serious about deficit reduction, we should make sure
's no deal, let's look at what happens to tax rates in just seven days and these stats are from the tax policy center. the annual income from somebody in the $50,000 to $75,000, about a $2,400 increase. jumping ahead to $100,000 to $200,000, the average tax increase, $6,600. tacking at that great divide of the wealthy, over $250,000, at least a $11,000 tax hike. over $1 million, more than $254,000. >> hampton, looking at that number, that's for those americans working right now. there are still struggling americans, millions looking for work and what's the fiscal cliff mean for them? >> reporter: okay. we have unemployment at 7.7% last month and mainly went down because people gave up looking for work and jdropped out of th job market and out of work six months or longer. 4.8 million americans, they're the folks worried the most about unemployment benefits not extended after the first of the year. >> as we look at that number, that's staggering for so many. we have a "the washington post" poll that indicates 74% of americans support raising taxes on the top earners in this country. with
that would raise taxes, would they allow it to -- and the answer to that is probably not. democrats have alleged for week now what john bain ser doing is waiting until the gavel is safely in his hands for the next congress. that happens on january 3rd, when they formally elect a speaker. that's one theory, but probably the thing that make the most sense is the fact that then it becomes a vote to cut taxes for 98% of americans, instead of allowing them to rise for 1% or 2%. that is something logically the republicans would probably or more likely go along with, though at this point who knows where we'll end up with on this thing. january 3rd is the new congress. in the days after that, that's the inertia it scenario. >> gentlemen, thanks so that. i appreciate it. >>> we want to bring in today's panel s perry bacon, democratic strategy margie omero, and chip saltzmann. i want to talk about with what steve la tourette had to say today being interviewed on cnn. >> this isn't a one party or a one house problem. this is leaders of both parties and all branches of the government not willing to
hook tragedy. >>> a massive tax hike and spending cuts -- republicans and democrats continue to point fingers in opposite directions, hinting that talks could go into the new year. >> are we going over the cliff? >> i believe we are, and i think the president is eager to go over the cliff for political purposes. he senses a victory at the bottom of the cliff. >> we only have nine days left here. when are we going to get serious about actual solutions? i would welcome john to tell me. he says he wants a solution. give us one, john. >> meanwhile, president obama is spending christmas in hawaii where he and the first lady attended the holiday memorial service for the late u.s. senator from daniel inouye. >> white house correspondent kristen welker. kristen, obviously they always say the white house travels with the president wherever he is. that's where the white house is. the president, though, is enjoying vacation, but still continuing to keep tabs on the fiscal cliff negotiations, correct? >> he is. white house officials describe this as a working vacation. i think there have been may
brought before the house, keeping the middle-class tax cuts, but not those for the upper income, and making sure the alternative minimum tax did not go into effect -- i think it would pass with a coalition. and i think the same could be true of unemployment insurance. 2 million people will lose their federal benefits tomorrow, if we don't have. 2 million people. >> when we snowe the fiscal cliff was imposed as a stopgap on you and all of your colleagues on the hill, are you disappointed that you've had to see it come down to the wire like this? this is basically a self-designed fiscal nightmare that you and all of your colleagues have created. are you disappointed that we haven't been ability to get it together more? >> absolutely. it shouldn't happen this way, but the republican conference showed last week how divided they are. >> there are republicans who don't want to vote for any tax increase. that's timied actions here. in the senate, i heard senator mcconnell that the november election -- that isn't true. the president was out there clearly saying there should be a continu
brink and taxes going up for all americans. so far, there's been no call for the house to get back to the hill. senators return to the capitol tomorrow. the question remains krks the president join congress and surf the rough political waters to get a deal in time? >> i think he's doing all he can and calving hell at the same time and there's give, give. i think it's very, very difficult, particularly after boehner's plan "b" failed. >> the key issue i think and the american people are catching on is that the problem that we have is we have a right wing political figure in the house way, way, way out of touch of what the american people are thinking. >>> there's early economic sinls that the uncertainty over the cliff may have clayed the role of scrooge this holiday season. early holiday numbers point to the worst year to year growth since 2008. >>> i think the president is steward of this economy needs to try to reach the big compromise with speaker boehner and the two men came very close. >> all right. let's check in and say good morning to nbc news correspondent mike vi cara now
that sentiment, if no deal is struck by next tuesday. people ma taxes will go up for everyone. you can see the numbers here, 40 to 65,000, it's $2,000 of a tax hike. so as constituents, if they were to call you and they say why is this happening, what are you going to say to them? >> well, first of all, that's not going to happen. we may go off the cliff on january 1st but we would correct that very quickly thereafter. what i'm telling them is the reason it's happening is we have idey ideologues in the house of representatives who don't believe there's a fiscal side of the budget. they're focused on cutting spending in unprecedented ways and they don't believe in taxes essentially. on the budget committee we've seen this day in and day out. these members of the house, and i don't know how many of them there are, but at least 50 or 60 basically have established a record in which ne hathey have firmly embraced the concept of not raising taxes and serious cuts that they put themselves in a box and they really can't get out and that's really tying up everything. because we can do a deal very q
he made. he limited the reach of the tax cut, changed the indexing of social security. he put that stuff in there to get republican votes. i think if john boehner -- and it would take courage, said we're going to let the whole housework its will, you can't pass a lot of reasonable bills if you worked from the center out instead of starting from the far right and see what they can take. it's clear they're not going to accept much of anything that might be helpful. >> red state was reporting 34 would bolt from the caucus. what's your thought here, e.j.? did the republicans do a disservice to themselves? >> absolutely. i think they took themselves out of the negotiation. in the end, the house has to approve something. you were mentioning that a deal could start in the senate. even if you get something through the senate, is it stalls has to pass the house. again it's john boehner taking a big political risk, but saying we're going to put together a coalition of republicans who want to govern and pass something together with democrats who want to govern and pass something. >>> i w
-back version of the grand bargain, something to prevent taxes going up, and also lay the groundwork potentially for deficit reduction in the future. i think you will see president obama cut his vacation short, and continue to play a role in those negotiations. richard. >>> kristin, over the weekend, he attended the funeral for the late senator inouye, who he has called an inspiration to him. what did you see in that service? >> well, more than 20 members of congress attended, mostly democrats, majority leader harry reid spoke and praised senator inouye for his partisan spirit, reaching across the aisle. of course in an earlier memorial service, the president called the late senator his earlier inspiration, on a a lot of members of congress came together to pay their respects. >> thank you, kristin. >>> if congress and the president fail to reach a deal, the impact is as unlikely as immediate as the term "fiscal cliff" seems to imply. the expiration of the tax cuts with a $2200 average tax high. the payroll tax cut would also expire meaning another $40 a paycheck and long-term unemployment benef
kfshs to pass a smaller deal, to delay those automatic spending cuts and to extend tax cuts for all except for the wealthiest of americans. now, while senators on both sides of the aisle, they spoke in support of at least a smaller deal on sunday. joe lieberman seemed to have less hope. >> it's the first time that i feel that it's more likely that we will go over the cliff than not, and that if we allow that to happen, it will be the most colossal consequential act of congressional irresponsibility in a long time. maybe ever in american history because of the impact it will have on almost every american. >> kristen welker is nbc's white house correspondent, also traveling with the president in honolulu. kristen, explain to all of us because it appears the lights are out in washington d.c. the president is in hawaii. everyone is home. with all the sides saying that they expect to go over the cliff, it looks pretty likely that that might just happen. >> well, i certainly think that concern is growing. that that's a real possibility at this point. at the same time, thomas, i think ther
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)